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Interdisciplinary climate conference

                                   CONNECTING THE DOTS: WATER 

Aalborg University Copenhagen, Department of Planning
January 15-16 2020

 

Water is key to life, humanity and societal dynamics. We drink it. We consist of it. Water is a life-giving resource and water is a destructive force. Water makes many mechanical and industrial productions run. Water is sacred in religious communities. And for modernity water represents economic value, energy and leisure.

Water was the unity of everything for the first Greek philosophers. Water is a way to think about the primal origin of all things and the fundamentally interconnectedness of everything. Water is a way to approach the climate crisis because it changes the earth’s water reservoirs and turns water from ice into liquid. Water is also a way to approach the biodiversity crisis because it carries the pollution of industrial production unfriendly to nature. And freshwater is our planet’s most precious resource connecting challenges of climate change, biodiversity, pollution, international economy and geopolitics.

The aim of this interdisciplinary conference CONNECTING THE DOTS: WATER is to engage scholars from multiple disciplines in a common dialogue about nature, humanity and society with the intended purpose of advancing our cognitive capacity and knowledge about climate change and the biodiversity crisis.

The conference is a key deliverable of Theresa Scavenius’ research project Green Transition Paths that explores our democratic societies’ institutional capacity to respond to the crises of climate and biodiversity and the green transition of technology, human behaviour and political institutions.

The research project builds on a problem-based methodology with the intended purpose of bridging the gap between scientific identification of problems related to climate change and proposed technological and societal solutions. Only by connecting insights and engaging scholars from all disciplines will we be capable of understanding the complexity of these socio-technical challenges and of identifying a green transition pathway from A to B.

The conference drafts challenges of climate change and biodiversity in innovative ways by offering a platform for interdisciplinary and problem-oriented dialogue. It will address and identify the problems related to water, and specify and outline the possible solutions from technical, sociological, political and humanistic approaches.

The conference builds on the organiser’s prior engagement in the Copenhagen Climate Change Workshop Series (2012-2014), The Lost Decade conference (March 2019) and advances our knowledge about the interlinkages between climate change, biodiversity crises, societal challenges and technological innovation.

We call for panels on: 

WATER and LIFE

WATER and ENERGY & INFRASTRUCTURE

WATER and HISTORY & PHILOSPHY

WATER and ANTHROPOLOGY & GEOGRAPHY 

WATER and LITERATURE AND RELIGION

WATER and GOVERNANCE & GEOPOLITICS

WATER and PRODUCTION

WATER and ECONOMY & SOCIETY

Deadline for panel submission: 15 November 2019. 

Deadline for registration 1 January 2020. Register here.

Conference Organisers

Associate Professor Theresa Scavenius & Research assistant Nanna Finne Skovrup
(Research project Green Transition Paths, Department of Planning, Aalborg University)

 

Confirmed Speakers and Panels 

Speakers 

Theresa Scavenius, Assistant professor, Aalborg University

 

Panels

No confrimed panels.

 

Programme 

The programme will be presented soon. 

 

THE CONFERENCE IS ORGANISED WITHIN THE FRAME OF THE AAU’S TALENT RESEARCH MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME.

REGISTRATION

For registration please click here.

Former events

Former events in the project 

Conference

THE LOST DECADE? PLANNING THE FUTURE

AALBORG UNIVERSITY COPENHAGEN, 28.02.19-01.03.19. 

COP15 became a defining moment in international climate change history. Mostly in negative terms. The failure to agree on a replacement for the Kyoto protocol resulted in a prolonged impasse in international climate change negotiations. It took more than half a decade to reach a comprehensive international agreement at COP21 in Paris. In the meantime, the world followed a business-as-usual model. 10 years after COP15 it therefore seems increasingly unlikely that the increase in global temperature will stay below 2 degrees Celsius as agreed in the Copenhagen Accord. In Denmark, the failure of COP15 has been particularly traumatic, both in the political system and in public opinion. The perceived ineptness of the Danish government and administration in securing a positive outcome for COP15 generated widespread climate apathy and a more subdued approach to international climate change policy. Only recently has the political system re-engaged with the climate agenda reflecting a renewed public interest and concern with the consequences of global warming. Thus, it has taken almost 10 years for Danish climate change policy to step out of the shadow of COP15.

The purpose of this conference is to create the academic and societal setting for dialogue and exchange of experiences to invoke new ideas and to plan the future. The conference provides a forum for climate scholars from all academic disciplines to meet societal stakeholders and citizens and to share knowledge about current challenges, obstacles and new possibilities.

The conference presents a series of keynotes addressing the lost decade. The keynotes are followed by several panels discussing reasons and causes of the lost decade. Why and what went wrong? Turning to a more future oriented perspective, a series of panels address the question of how to plan the future. Focus is drawn to the main climate harming sectors.

 

SPEAKERS

Welcome by Dean Henrik Pedersen and Associate professor Theresa Scavenius 

Brian Vad Mathiesen, Professor, Aalborg University
Sustainable Energy systems can solve more challenges than the Climate Crisis

Daniel Sarewitz, Professor, Arizona State University
Lessons from Three Lost Decades

Frede Hvelplund, Professor, Aalborg University
Climate policy, ownership models and democracy

Inge Røpke, Professor, Aalborg University
Economics for sustainability

Katherine Richardson, Professor, University of Copenhagen
Where in the world is the climate headed?

Klaus Skytte, Head of Energy Economics and Regulation, Technical University of Denmark
Regulating the green energy revolution

Peter Birch Sørensen, Professor, University of Copenhagen
Designing international negotiations on climate policy: An economist’s perspective

Simon Caney, Professor, University of Warwick
Democracy and governing for the long term

Theresa Scavenius, Associate professor, Aalborg University
The Vicious Circle


PANELS

PANEL 1: PUBLIC CLIMATE ENGAGEMENT AS POST-NORMAL SCIENCE? A DANISH CASE

Stefan Gaarsmand Jacobsen, Assistant professor, Roskilde University
Anders Blok, Associate professor, University of Copenhagen
Gregers Andersen, Postdoctoral researcher, Stockholm University

Irina Papazu, Assistant Professor, Copenhagen Business School

PANEL 2: KLIMAPOLITIK, NÅR MARKEDER ER HVERKEN NATURLIGE ELLER PERFEKTE, MEN REGEL-BASEREDE ARENAER FOR KONKURRENCE

Peter Karnøe, Professor, Aalborg University
Jens Stissing Jensen, Associate professor, Aalborg University‚Äč
Klaus Skytte, Head of Energy Economics and Regulation, The Technical University of Denmark
Susse Georg, Professor, Aalborg University

PANEL 3: THE INTERNET'S RISING ENERGY CONSUMPTION

Leif Katsuo Oxenløwe, Professor, Technical University of Denmark
Dag Lundén, Environmental Manager, Telia Company
Anders Andrae, Senior Expert Life Cycle Assessment, Huawei Technologies
Torsten Hasforth, Senior advisor, Danish Energy
Mads Flarup Christensen, Executive Director Nordics, Greenpeace 

PANEL 4: KLIMAFORANDRINGER I DANSKE NYHEDSMEDIER (IN DANISH) 

Mikkel Fugl Eskjær, Associate professor, Aalborg University
Adam Hannestad, Climate Journalist, Politiken
John Nordbo, Climate Advocacy, CARE Denmark

PANEL 5: THE POTENTIALS OF NEW RENEWABLE TECHNOLOGIES

Peter Christian Kjærgaard Vesborg, Associate professor, Technical University of Denmark
Brian Vad Mathiesen, Professor, Aalborg University

Kenneth Bernard Karlsson, Senior Scientist, Technical University of Denmark
Hans Chr. Sørensen, Director, Wave Dragon

PANEL 6: POLITICS OF RESPONSIBLE AND SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY 

Lars Botin, Associate professor, Aalborg University
Rasmus Haarløv, Research assistant, Aalborg University
Tom Børsen, Associate professor, Aalborg University

PANEL 7: Democratic engagement and climate change

Theresa Scavenius, Associate professor, Aalborg University
Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen, Professor, Aarhus University
Simon Caney, Professor, University of Warwick
Bjørn Bedsted, Deputy Director, The Danish Board of Technology

PANEL 8: NEW WIND POWER SOLUTIONS TO DECARBONIZE HEAVY TRANSPORTATION 

Henrik Bach Mortensen, Industrial Ph.D., Aalborg University and Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy
Peter Esmann, Senior Product Manager, Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy

PANEL 9:A COHERENT TRANSPORT SYSTEM FOR GREATER COPENHAGEN 2050

Andrés Felipe Valderrama Pineda, Associate professor, Aalborg University
Birgitte Hoffmann, Associate professor, Aalborg University
Joe Jensen, Project leader, The Capital Region of Denmark

PANEL 10: CULTURAL VISIONS: NEGOTIATING CLIMATE CHANGE IN ART AND POPULAR CULTURE

Mikkel Fugl Eskjær, Associate professor, Aalborg University
Gregers Andersen, Postdoctoral researcher, Stockholm University
Torsten Bøgh Thomsen, Assistant Professor, University of Southern Denmark
Ida Bencke, Co-founder, Laboratory for Aesthetics and Ecology 

PANEL 11: DISTRICT HEATING AND WASTE incineration: breaking the lock-in in an era of circular economy and decarbonization

Nis Bertelsen, Ph.D fellow, Aalborg University
Michael Søgaard Jørgensen, Associate professor, Aalborg University
Susana Paardekooper, Ph.D fellow, Aalborg University

PANEL 12: HOw to translate knowlegde to socity

The green student movement

Panel 13: HVORDAN KAN SUPERCYKELSTIER BIDRAGE TIL MERE BÆREDYGTIG MOBILITET I GREATER COPENHAGEN? (IN DANISH)

Anne Katrine Harders, Senior project leader, Danish Architecture Center
Andrés Felipe Valderrama Pineda, Associate professor, Aalborg University
Sidsel Birk Hjuler, Programme leader, Supercykelstier
Ninna Hedeager Olsen, Tecnical and Environmental Mayor, Municipality of Copenhagen
Rasmus Haarløv, Research assistant, Aalborg University

Panel 14: CLIMATE AND FINANCE - ALSO A LOST DECADE?

Inge Røpke, Professor, Aalborg University
Erik Lundsgaarde, Senior researcher, DIIS
Frederik Lasserre, Analyst, CEVEA
Jarl Krausing, International director, CONCITO

Panel 15: EMISSIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS FROM THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Michael Havbro Faber, Professor, Aalborg University
Lærke Dahl Klausen, Project leader, CLEAN
Gang Liu, Professor mso, University of Southern Denmark

Panel 16: TOURISM AND CLIMATE CHANGE – WHERE TO NEXT?

Carina Ren, Associate professor, Aalborg University
Dimitri Ioannides, Professor, Mid-Sweden University
Scott Cohen, Professor, University of Surrey
Szilvia Gyimóthy, Associate professor, Aalborg University

Panel 17: BÆREDYGTIGT HVERDAGSLIV I BÆREDYGTIGE BYER: MANGFOLDIGE FORBINDELSER (IN DANISH)

Toke Haunstrup Christensen, Senior Researcher, Aalborg University  
Lars A. Engberg, Senior Researcher, Aalborg University
Lykke Leonardsen, programme leader, green city solutions, Municipality of Copenhagen
Tina Unger, programme leader, Lejre Municipality 

Panel 18: BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN ACADEMIA, BUSINESS AND THE PUBLIC SECTOR

David S. Miller, Strategic Communications Consultant, The Climate Reality Project
Peter Birch Sørensen, Professor, University of Copenhagen
Daniel Sarewitz, Professor, Arizona State University

Panel 19: ARCTIC: LIVING IN A CHANGING CLIMATE

Lucia Mortensen, Ph.D. fellow, Aalborg University
Hans Meltofte, Senior adviser emeritus, Aarhus University
Mette Frost, Senior advisor, WWF
Zita Bak-Jensen, M.Sc, Aalborg University
Anders Mosbech, Senior Scientist, Research and advisory manager, Aarhus University

Panel 20: SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION OF TEXTILES. WHAT IS IT, AND HOW CAN WE GET THERE?

Else Skjold, Assistant Professor, Design School Kolding
Lena Trend Hansen, Product Director, COZE/ LauRie + ECHTE
Ingun Klepp, Professor, Oslo Metropolitan University

Panel 21: How do we make the green transition for 150 kroner a month per dane?

Anders Winther Mortensen, Ph.D. fellow, University of Southern Denmark
Kasper Dalgas Rasmussen, Ph.D. fellow, University of Southern Denmark

Panel 22: FUTURE FOOD 

Lars-Henrik Lau Heckmann, Ph.D., Head of Section, Danish Technological Institute
Søren Bisp, Ph.D, Chief Consultant, SEGES
Søren Bøye Olsen, Professor, University of Copenhagen

Kristian Skaarup, Landscape Architect, ØsterGRO

Joint session: Connecting the dots: Green transition plan

Theresa Scavenius, Associate professor, Aalborg University
 


PROGRAMME

The final programme for the conference is available here. 
The extented programme for the conference is available here.

 

Conference poster 

The flyer for the conference is available here.

 

The conference is organised within the frame of the AAU’s Talent Research Management Programme.

AAU Facts & Norms Workshop IV

Realism: common ground for naturalists and social constructivists?

Scientific inquiry aims at comprehending correlations and relationships in the physical and social world. Different methodologies and methods are used to detect, examine and scrutinize layers of historical, discursive and social content. There is a common agreement across disciplines that self-critical reflection on the use of methods and fundamental theoretical assumptions are key to scientific enterprises. This critical and systematic use of methodologies and methods is what distinguishes scientific knowledge production from other types of knowledge production. Science wars have been fought. Naturalists have disagreed with social constructionists about the ontology of nature and about the epistemologies useful for scientific knowledge production. The wars have drawn clear demarcation lines between schools of thoughts and scientific disciplines.

The purpose of the Facts & Norms workshop IV: Realism – common ground for naturalists and social constructivists? is move beyond the metaphysical discussion to the benefit of discussing whether proponents of naturalism and social constructivism share a common Erkenntnisinteresse: the scientific ambition of obtaining knowledge about the world. The science wars have not been about the objectives of science but rather about the mutual criticism of useful methodologies and ontological assumptions. This cross-disciplinary Erkenntnisinteresse may be coined as realism. The social constructivists may find it harder to obtain knowledge about the real world compared to naturalists and “neo-positivists”. Nonetheless, the ambition of constructivists’ scientific inquiry might as well be knowledge production about physical or social realities in the world.

 

Confirmed speakers

Ask Greve Jørgensen

Lars Bo Henriksen

Peter Karnøe & Susse Georg

Tom Børsen, Lars Botin & Christian Baron

Theresa Scavenius

 

The programme for the workshop is available here

 

Venue: The black diamant 

Dates: 23-24 August 2018

 

Earlier Facts & Norms workshops

The Facts & Norms Workshops I and II held in August 2013 and August 2015 discussed what role facts may play in the normative theorising. The result was a collection of papers espousing different views on how facts bear on political theory/philosophy. (These papers are accepted for publication in CRISPP in 2017). According to some of these contributors, political theory is unavoidably sensitive to various facts. Other contributors hold more conventional views on the pertinent relationship between facts and norms, while being open to the possibility that while facts bear on how fundamental normative principles apply to the world, these principles themselves make no factual assumptions.

Facts & Norms Workshop III took the debate one step further by examining the essentially contested relationship between factual and normative judgements. We tend to assume that concepts, theories and facts have something important to say to each other. We talk about 'applying principles on political cases', 'justifying practices by referring to norms' and 'deriving implications of norms on facts'. However, how these relationships are constructed and determined remains under-theorised. What does it mean to say that 'one justifies a politics by normative principles' or that 'one applies normative principles to politics'?

The Facts & Norms Workshop III questioned the relevance of theorising the relationship between factual and normative judgements by referring to ‘justifying’, ‘applying’ and ‘deriving’. Instead, the workshop will examine the possibility of a fundamental indeterminacy between factual and normative judgements. On the basis of this, the workshop will propose alternative ways to comprehend the interlinkages between facts and norms. One such way may be fact-sensitive normative principles that theorise normative principles in light of factual concerns. Another way may be a pre-suppositional relationship where facts select relevant sets of normative principles. Yet another way may be questions related to the argument that ‘can’ constraints have a bearing on normative principles: does ‘can’ imply ‘ought’? To what extent may ‘can’ constraints constitute a third type of judgements that draws on both factual and normative judgements but nonetheless appreciates that factual and normative judgement do not determine each other? Papers presented at the workshop are will soon be submitted for review for publication in a symposium in Res Publica.

The Facts & Norms Workshop IV will continue the work accomplished at the three previous workshops by advancing the conversation on the political relevance of meta-theoretical discussion in urgent time of political polarization and de-democratisation.

 

Organizer:

Theresa Scavenius, PhD, Associate Professor, Aalborg University Copenhagen.

Green Transition